Conversations

ConverStation instruction for participants

To support discussion and interaction, oral paper presentations at ICT4S 2019 will take place through a session format we call ConverStation. During the ConverStation, papers are presented around tables, each with a maximum of 6-10 seats – this is to support good interaction. At the conference, each ConverStation will have around 8-9 papers presented in parallel.

Select presentations

Each ConverStation comprise three rounds of presentations, of 25 minutes each. Before the ConverStation starts, you will select three different presentations to attend. The selection is made in the room, just before the ConverStation starts. It cannot be done in advance.

Selection is made through getting ‘tickets’ for the presentations you want to attend. Note that the tickets are valid for a specific round, so make sure that you select one ticket per round. The exact number of seats at each presentation will be adjusted to ensure an even distribution of audience to all presentations. Thus, tickets for some papers in some rounds may be “sold out” and you might need to accept attending some unexpected presentations.

To facilitate the selection process we strongly encourage you to at least skim through the proceedings before the conference. We also recommend that you select more than three papers per ConverStation since tickets might be “sold out”. Each presentation will have a total of 25 minutes at its disposal. This includes 10 minutes for presentation and 15 minutes for discussions. In order to make the ConverStation work all presentations must start and end at the same time, so there will be no room for running overtime.

Note:

  • There are 3 ConverStations sessions at the conference, one on each day. Each session will have different papers presented
  • Within a ConverStation session, there are 3 rounds of presentations – choose 3 different papers, make sure you get one paper per round.

ConverStation instructions for presenters

During the ConverStation you will present your paper by a table with a maximum of 6-10 seats; this to support good interaction. At the conference, each ConverStation will have around 8-9 papers presented in parallel.

To allow for more than 6-10 people to attend your presentation, each ConverStation comprises three rounds of presentations. This means that you will present your paper three (3) times during the same ConverStation, but with different audiences. Before the ConverStation starts, the participants will select three different presentations to attend.

Prepare your presentation

Since the presentations will be held while sitting together with the audience around a small table, we recommend you to adjust your presentation to this setting. A traditional PowerPoint presentation will probably not work that well. Instead we encourage you to prepare your presentation for close interaction with the audience. If you want to show pictures or PowerPoint slides bring your own laptop and show these on your screen.

Each presentation will have a total of 25 min at its disposal. This includes 10 min for presentation and 15 min for discussions. In order to make the ConverStation work all presentations must start and end at the same time, so there will be no room for running overtime.

Note that there is no projector or whiteboard – bring your own laptop or printed material to show pictures, graphs, slides etc.

ConverStation sessions

Wed 12.6 11.10 Session 1.2 ConverStations I

  • Sidewalk and Toronto: Critical Systems Heuristics and the Smart City, Curtis McCord & Christoph Becker
  • nformal processing of electronic waste in Agbogbloshie, Ghana: A complex adaptive systems perspective, Alice Frantz Schneider
  • Leaky “Resilient Smart Gardens” Pilots in the Wild – An action research for improving multidisciplinary capstone projects, Birgit Penzenstadler, Libby Gustin, Caitlin Rubia, Brian Powell & Christian Anca
  • ICT Sustainability from Day One: Introducing new Computer Science students at a UK University to Sustainability, TBA
  • Per-appliance energy feedback as a moving target, Erik Rosberg, Cristian Bogdan, Anders Lundström & Omar Shafqat
  • Energy consumption of data centers worldwide – How will the Internet become green?, Ralph Hintemann & Simon Hinterholzer
  • Addressing the challenges of the Circular Economy using model-based co-creation and systems design, Jan Hendrik Roodt & Clemens Dempers
  • A Heliotropic Kubernetes Scheduler, Aled James & Daniel Schien

Thu 13.6 at 11.10 Session 2.2 ConverStations II

  • Equality Requirements for Software Systems: A Survey, Maryam Ali Al Hinai & Ruzanna Chitchyan
  • Share or Waste? Using an ICT-platform to share food on a university campus, Cecilia Katzeff, Annika Carlsson Kanyama & Jorge Zapico
  • igital Rebound – Why Digitalization Will Not Redeem Us Our Environmental Sins, Vlad C. Coroama & Friedemann Mattern
  • Gaming at work to save energy – Learnings from workers playing a cooperative game, Anders Lundström
  • Exploring Implications of Capacity Based Electricity Pricing, Dan Schien, Colin Nolden, Caroline Bird, Denise Wilkins, Kopo M. Ramokapane, Chris Preist, Phani Chittix, Ruzanna Chitchyan
  • Energy Efficiency Platform Characterization for Heterogeneous Multicore Architectures, Hergys Rexha & Sébastien Lafond
  • Exploratory Case Study on Sustainability Analysis with a Startup for Business Models, Birgit Penzenstadler, Anoushka Mara, Stephanie Nam & Brian Budzinski
  • Using Participatory Technical-action-research to validate a Software Sustainability Model, Nelly Condori Fernandez, Patricia Lago, Miguel Luaces, Angeles Saavedra & Leticia Gonzalez